•  
    July 6, 2005
    by phil
    Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone
    Play

    90 minutes

    • What are the latest scientific developments?
    • Is there a level of climate change that we should aim not to exceed in order to avoid the worst impacts?
    • What should the government be doing at the national and international level during this critical year to help achieve this?

    We ask:

    • David Griggs – Director, Hadley Centre, The Meteorological Office’s Centre for Climate Prediction and Research
    • Peter Ainsworth MP – Chair, Environmental Audit Committee
    • Tony Grayling – Associate Director, Institute of Public Policy Research
  •  
    July 6, 2005
    by phil
    Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone
    Play

    We ask John Nicholson of the UK Bio-Power Network about the potential for reused vegetable oils to power UK road transport.

    We also explore the role of campaigning in an interview with the head of Friends of the Earth’s climate campaign, Bryony Worthington:

    • What is the current status of Kyoto?
    • What is the EU doing?
    • How can the UK’s remaining coal-fired stations be shut down?
    • Should the UK taxpayer be supporting new oil developments?
    • What is the potential for litigation cases against fossil fuel companies?
    • Switching to green energy.
    • How to get involved.
  •  
    August 28, 2003
    by phil
    Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone
    Play

    How is the UK government responding to climate change? Does it have an effective programme for reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions? Is it doing enough to avert disaster? We ask Professor Paul Ekins, Head of the Environment Group at the Policy Studies Institute, adviser to parliament’s Energy Audit Select Committee, and Member of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution.

    BBC2’s Newsnight reported in July last year that for every tonne of carbon the UK had saved at home, 3 tonnes of carbon had been produced abroad. We ask Anita Goldsmith of Greenpeace about the government’s funding of coal-fired power stations overseas.

    We also speak to Steve Waller who ran a pilot programme for local councils developing strategies to deal with climate change.

  •  
    July 31, 2003
    by phil
    Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone
    Play

    We ask three experts about the science of climate change:

    • David Griggs, director of the Hadley Centre for climate change research at the Meteorological Office; David plays an ongoing role in the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change – the world’s leading authority on the science of climate change
    • Mark Lynas has travelled the world to see some of the effects of global warming first hand and whose book “High Tide: News from a Warming World” is published by Flamingo in March 2004
    • Peter Cox, a carbon cycle modeller at the Hadley Centre, who will look at the dangers of “positive feedback” scenarios
Climate Radio | Independent bulletins from the worlds of climate science, politics and activism
class="home blog paged paged-24 samba_theme samba_responsive wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.7.4 vc_responsive"