Copenhagen

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    December 18, 2008
    by phil
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    poznan-assessment_isdht1The UN Climate Talks are at crisis point. Nothing on the table matches the scale of the challenge and corporate interests are rife. As the talks in Poznan come to an end, we take stock with three key protaganists: Kevin Smith (CarbonTradeWatch), Oliver Tickell (Kyoto2) and Tom Athanasiou (Greenhouse Development Rights).

    Developments include:

    • UNFCCC tenders a report on alternative frameworks
    • 350 ppm CO2 target endorsed by Al Gore, AOSIS & the LDC country blocks
    • Potsdam Institute shows how we can achieve the 350 ppm target
    • Climate Justice Now! coalition grows in size from 20 to 160 organisations
    • Carbon trading advances despite a crisis of credibility
    • 142 organisations sign a statement against the World Bank’s involvement with climate funds
    • The China+G77 block support climate funds being managed by UN
    • Rich nations still failing to fulfill their commitments 16 years on
    • Plans develop for a mass mobilisation in Copenhagen December 2009
    • Could extending the scope of the Montreal Protocol and controling black soot be two effective ways forward outside the UNFCCC process?
  •  
    December 11, 2008
    by phil
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    300-350_17_thumbnail_4msbjWe continue our coverage of the UN Climate Talks in Poznan, Poland where the big issue on the table is “how to reduce emissions from deforestation”? The big push from investors is to incorporate forests into the carbon markets, but this approach is riddled with problems. Friends of the Earth International has warned that this would “create the climate regime’s biggest ever loophole.” We speak to Miguel Lovera, chair of the Global Forest Coalition about his concerns and his proposals for an alternative way forward.

    Meanwhile in Brussels, European country delegates have been agreeing new targets for agrofuel for road transport. This will increase deforestation and emissions from other changes in land use. We speak to Robert Bailey of Oxfam International and ask why this disaster has been allowed to happen.

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    November 27, 2008
    by phil
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    300-350_16_thumbnail_nysxa1We continue our lead in to this year’s UN climate talks in Poznan with a look at a proposal that seeks to break the current deadlock and lead to a fair deal which both delivers climate safety and protects the poor.

    The Greenhouse Development Rights framework is supported by Christian Aid, Oxfam, Stockholm Environment Institute and the Heinrich Boll Foundation.

    We speak to Tom Athanasiou, Director of EcoEquity and co-author of the GDR framework.

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    November 24, 2008
    by phil
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    300-350_15_thumbnail_fxfta1In a special supplement to our usual weekly programme we give you an opportunity to hear another 40 minutes of our interview with Kyoto2 architect, Oliver Tickell.

    We look at the Kyoto2 scheme in more detail and explore:

    • What its effect on coal use would be
    • Whether the scheme could work alongside national carbon rationing schemes (eg TEQs)
    • Whether the scheme could emerge out of a combination of a reformed EU Emissions Trading Scheme and Barack Obama’s Cap and Trade System
    • Whether it would create a market in carbon and if so how would that work
    • What its effect on the economy would be
    • How it would be policed

    “Kyoto2 – How to Manage the Global Greenhouse”

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    November 20, 2008
    by phil
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    300-350_14_thumbnail_gmbdm1We start our coverage of this year’s UN Climate Change Talks in Poznan Poland with a look at an alternative proposal for a global climate deal called “Kyoto2”. The scheme would limit emissions by rationing the production of fossil fuels at source and would generate a trillion dollar fund to help poor countries adapt to climate change, to preserve forests and to help decarbonise the globe. There is also a strong component of direct regulation. We speak to the scheme’s architect, Oliver Tickell.

    “Kyoto2 – How to Manage the Global Greenhouse”

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    November 16, 2005
    by phil
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    What needs to come next after the first Kyoto Protocol period expires in 2012? If we agree that 2 degrees centigrade is the maximum limit beyond which dangerous climate change takes hold – and that to avoid this we need to stabilise emissions of all greenhouse gases at around 400ppmv (CO2 equivalent) – then it is clear that we urgently need a much stronger agreement if we are to reverse the current global trend of rising emissions.

    How do we avoid the arguments about the amounts of greenhouse gases that individual nations are able to emit and make sure that we do not end up with another inadequate agreement?

    Under the Contraction & Convergence solution, a scientifically-informed emissions reduction curve is drawn up which results in every person on the planet ending up with an equal right to emit. We speak to the architect of the scheme, Aubrey Meyer of the Global Commons Institute.

Climate Radio | Copenhagen
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