Transport

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    July 9, 2009
    by phil
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    ricardo-navarro-cesta1

    We get a majority world perspective on the climate emergency from Goldman Prize winner Ricardo Navarro. Navarro won the Goldman prize for sustainable development back in 1995 for his work as founder and director of the El Salvador Centre for Appropriate Technology and he is a former director of Friends of the Earth International.

    Here he talks about how a new regional Movement of Climate Change Affected Peoples is responding to the pressures of climate change with awareness raising, permaculture techniques and low-level technologies as well as putting up resistance to inappropriate development. He also gives us his wider perspective on the United Nations climate talks which he has been attending since 1992.

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    September 17, 2008
    by phil
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    300-350_9_thumbnail_veuy1The Liberal Democrats climate change policies are regarded by environmental campaign groups as the most progressive of the major parties in the UK. These include

    • energy independence and a zero-carbon Britain by 2050
    • an efficiency standard for new power stations that would rule out unabatted coal
    • no nuclear power
    • no replacement for our Trident nuclear arsenal
    • green taxes
    • investment in public transport including a high speed rail network and complete electrification of the network
    • virtually no airport expansion

    The Lib Dems have also been actively working to strengthen the UK’s Climate Change Bill. But has the profile of their green policies taken a back seat as the economy takes a downward turn? We travel to Bournemouth to their party conference to interview the party’s shadow secretaries for the environment – Steve Webb MP – and transport – Norman Baker MP.

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    October 16, 2007
    by phil
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    lcs_15_thumbnail_nj1w81In the last show of this series, we cycle to the local farmers market and see our low-carbon future emerging in front of our very eyes.

    We interview the following traders and cyclists at Alexandra Palace farmers’ market:

    • Chris Elder (City and Country Farmers Markets)
    • Martin (Pitfield Brewery)
    • Adam Coffman (of CTC – the UK’s national cycling organisation)
    • Helen & Jim (producers of biodiesel from used cooking oil)

    With music from The Carbon Town Cryer

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    September 24, 2007
    by phil
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    lcs_14_thumbnail_bf4tl1Britain can become free of fossil fuels and self-sufficient in energy and food in just 20 years. That is the conclusion of the most ambitious report yet on what Britain needs to do to play its part in avoiding dangerous climate change. What will Britain be like and how will we get there?

    We speak to the co-ordinator and co-lead author of the Centre for Alternative Technology’s new report “Zero Carbon Britain”, Tim Helweg-Larsen. Why are Tradeable Energy Quotas expected to be the most effective way to drive the changes? What will be the impacts on transport, agriculture, buildings and – most importantly – our well-being?

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    September 18, 2007
    by phil
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    lcs_13_thumbnail_iograLike Slow Food, Slow Travel is all about quality rather than speed. We investigate this emerging concept with two of its leading proponents:

    • Author and deputy editor of The Idler, Dan Kieran, who recently travelled across England in a milkfloat;
    • Founder of fledgeling low-carbon travel agent Loco2, Jamie Andrews, who is co-authoring the Slow Travel Manifesto
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    September 5, 2007
    by phil
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    lcs_12_thumbnail_g0jadWhat will holidays be like in a low carbon world?

    Will we feel the need to escape so much if we are living less stressful, more community-focussed, local lives that give us greater well-being?

    We speak to Laura Burgess, editor of a new directory called Ecoescape which brings together sustainable accomodation, eateries, and environmentally-focused places to visit in the UK.

    We also speak to artist Lottie Child who has been developing the practice of “street training” with people of all ages and exploring creative approaches for interacting with, and feeling at home in, our own localities.

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    May 9, 2007
    by phil
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    lcs_2_thumbnail_3q2bdHOW TO LIVE A LOW CARBON LIFE

    Chris Goodall has just written what the New Scientist calls “the definitive guide to reducing your carbon footprint.” Climate Radio takes a trip to Oxford to meet Chris and find out some of the book’s key messages on aviation, consumption, personal travel and food purchasing habits.

    www.lowcarbonlife.

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    March 13, 2007
    by phil
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    The Mayor of London has just launched a trail-blazing Climate Change Action Plan which gives London a target of a 60% reduction in CO2 by 2025. The Two Degrees Show spoke to Mark Watts, the Mayor’s senior advisor on energy to find out how this will be achieved.

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    October 24, 2006
    by phil
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    Award-winning journalist George Monbiot explains why we need to cut carbon emissions in the UK by 90% by 2030. In his major new book “Heat – How to Stop the Planet Burnging” (Penguin Allen Lane) he sifts through all the policy options on the table (as well as coming up with some of his own) and looks at what might work and what won’t. “Heat” is no less than a survival manual for the biosphere. If we are to escape the worst impacts of climate change we need to start putting its recommendations into practice now. At present politicians seem incapable of doing this, so we need to do what ever it takes to force them to act.

    Here’s the plan

Climate Radio | Transport
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