UN Talks

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    November 24, 2008
    by phil
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    300-350_15_thumbnail_fxfta1In a special supplement to our usual weekly programme we give you an opportunity to hear another 40 minutes of our interview with Kyoto2 architect, Oliver Tickell.

    We look at the Kyoto2 scheme in more detail and explore:

    • What its effect on coal use would be
    • Whether the scheme could work alongside national carbon rationing schemes (eg TEQs)
    • Whether the scheme could emerge out of a combination of a reformed EU Emissions Trading Scheme and Barack Obama’s Cap and Trade System
    • Whether it would create a market in carbon and if so how would that work
    • What its effect on the economy would be
    • How it would be policed

    “Kyoto2 – How to Manage the Global Greenhouse”

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    November 20, 2008
    by phil
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    300-350_14_thumbnail_gmbdm1We start our coverage of this year’s UN Climate Change Talks in Poznan Poland with a look at an alternative proposal for a global climate deal called “Kyoto2”. The scheme would limit emissions by rationing the production of fossil fuels at source and would generate a trillion dollar fund to help poor countries adapt to climate change, to preserve forests and to help decarbonise the globe. There is also a strong component of direct regulation. We speak to the scheme’s architect, Oliver Tickell.

    “Kyoto2 – How to Manage the Global Greenhouse”

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    November 21, 2006
    by phil
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    We assess the outcomes of the talks and illustrate it with audio from the talks and press conferences in Nairobi:

    • If we haven’t seen anything like the degree of urgency this situation demands then what can explain the frustrating lack of progress?
    • Is the EU holding out for a global deal that includes developing countries in order to get the US back on board (as indicated in its 2005 position paper), rather than leading by example by with a commitment to 30% cuts by 2020?
    • What is the potential for movement in the US position now that there is a new balance of power in Congress?
    • Can the democrats get some of the ‘cap and trade’ legislation through that is on the table and start engaging constructively in the international process?
    • Did the talks make significant progress in helping the poorest and most vulnerable countries adapt to the effects of climate change or make significant progress in meeting the commitment to transfer clean energy technologies to developing countries?
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    November 14, 2006
    by phil
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    Halfway through the UN climate talks in Nairobi we offer you an assessment of where things are at by presenting what the alliance of environmental charities and the UN Secretariat have been saying in their press conferences over the last few days.

    The two main spokespeople you will hear are:

    Steve Sawyer who works for Greenpeace in the United States and is also the main spokesman for the Climate Action Network International – the umbrella group for the hundreds of non-government organisations who are trying to positively influence the talks.

    Yvo de Boer, head of the U.N. Climate Change Secretariat

    • Will the Review of the Protocol be completed in time for it to take effect in 2012?
    • What role should developing countries be playing in future commitment periods?
    • Are the EU playing a leadership role and commiting to 30% CO2 cuts by 2020?
    • Have the countries with commitments under the Kyoto Protocol made “demonstrable progress” in meeting their targets?
    • With the Democrats now in control of Congress, when will the US start to re-engage?
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    November 7, 2006
    by phil
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    The Two Degrees show opens a window on the UN climate change talks as they kick off in Nairobi. The current Kyoto Protocol is “a drop in the bucket” and inadequate to achieve the UN objective of avoiding dangerous climate change. Are industrialised countries willing to take much deeper cuts in emissions? Are these countries making big enough efforts to help rapidly developing countries such as India and China develop cleanly? What prospect is there of the US engaging constructively when their delegation last year was led by Harlan Watson at the recommendation of Exxon Mobil? We speak to MJ Mace of Foundation for International Environmental Law and Development (FIELD) who is a legal advisor to the Association of Small Island States at the talks and to Jan Kowalzig, climate change and energy campaigner at Friends of the Earth Europe.

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    December 7, 2005
    by phil
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    Climate Confidential has the very latest on the UN Climate Talks from our contacts in Canada:

    • Simon Retallack from International Climate Change Task Force/IPPR
    • Catherine Pearce from Friends of the Earth International
    • Matthew Carroll, co-ordinator, Youth Caucus, UN Commission on Sustainable Development; and Elissa Smith, president of the Canadian Youth Environmental Network, which represents over 300 environmental youth organizations in Canada.
    • plus! an exciting written statement from DEFRA!
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    November 30, 2005
    by phil
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    As the first ‘Meeting of the Parties’ since Kyoto came into force gets underway Montreal, we talk to Mark Lynas, author of “High Tide: News From A Warming World.” Mark is a veteran of the UN talks and has written an open letter to the delegates which was published in The Independent on the day the talks opened.

    We end today’s programme a climate change rap entitled “So People” kindly donated by unsigned band Pollination X. Contact info {at} pollinationx.com

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    November 23, 2005
    by phil
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    “The Montreal talks will be the key to determining the future for all life on earth.” – Tony Juniper, Director, Friends of the Earth in The Guardian, 23/11/05

    “It’s very important that pressure is maintained in the next few months so that the United States and all parties go to Montreal and are prepared to talk about long-term targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions.” – Bob Ward, Royal Society spokesperson on Climate Confidential, 13/7/05

    • What will the European Union’s negotiating position be in Montreal?
    • Will Margaret Beckett be arguing for adequate and binding targets?
    • How do we get the US back on board?

    Catherine Pearce from Friends of the Earth International guides us through the fog.

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    November 16, 2005
    by phil
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    What needs to come next after the first Kyoto Protocol period expires in 2012? If we agree that 2 degrees centigrade is the maximum limit beyond which dangerous climate change takes hold – and that to avoid this we need to stabilise emissions of all greenhouse gases at around 400ppmv (CO2 equivalent) – then it is clear that we urgently need a much stronger agreement if we are to reverse the current global trend of rising emissions.

    How do we avoid the arguments about the amounts of greenhouse gases that individual nations are able to emit and make sure that we do not end up with another inadequate agreement?

    Under the Contraction & Convergence solution, a scientifically-informed emissions reduction curve is drawn up which results in every person on the planet ending up with an equal right to emit. We speak to the architect of the scheme, Aubrey Meyer of the Global Commons Institute.

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    November 9, 2005
    by phil
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    The first in a series of shows looking forward to the UN climate change discussions in Montreal takes a look at the need to set internationally agreed thresholds which will give us the targets we need to avoid dangerous climate change. We speak to Simon Retallack of the International Climate Change Task Force who tells us that we need to keep warming within 2 degrees centigrade if we are to avoid:

    • irreversible loss of the Amazon rainforest and 95% of coral reefs
    • global food insecurity
    • a third of the world’s population facing the threat of water scarcity
    • and ‘positive’ feedbacks that would result in much greater levels of warming

    Will the talks in Montreal result in an agreement on such limits and thereby set the framework for binding targets that might help us avoid disaster? What are we to make of Tony Blair’s recent pronouncements against binding targets? What will the EU be taking to the negotiating table?

    For more information, see Setting a Long-Term Climate Objective by Simon Retallack for the International Climate Change Taskforce

Climate Radio | UN Talks
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